I found myself discussing software implementation strategies with colleagues  today, and a question was posed to me about a stalled project at an organization we’re familiar with.  The project has been stalled for quite a while, and even the predictable flared tempers are starting to die down.  The project appears to be on a long slow death march, according to some insightful observers.

I don’t necessarily agree.  I’ve seen more moribund projects than this one be revived and become successful generators of organizational ROI.  For me, the key is the perspective of the person at the top.  If that person still believes in the strategic and operational value of the project, and if the technology tool is viable, then the project can be saved.  If the person at the top has lost interest, or never had it in the first place, then everyone should pack up and go home. 

It really comes down to leadership and whether the CEO is willing or capable of exercising it.  It’s that simple.  A strategic software implementation in a human services nonprofit is an exercise in and a committment to an overhaul of tired business processes, to a reorganization of duties, and to a new way of measuring success.  CEOs need to be prepared for the inevitable grumbling they will hear along the way.

This isn’t unique to human services organizations—every enterprise implementation faces those challenges.  What’s a little different for those of us in the human services’ world is that our organizations in general haven’t developed much sophistication around technology.  I often see the extremes of a culture that shuns technology and whose employees don’t know how to use a computer and a culture of thinking that  clicking the “install” button on shiny new software will solve all organizational ills, living side by side in the same agency.  The CEO has got to step up.

So, to all my CEO readers, take a deep breath and own the technology plan for your agency.  It’s a great way to get to know your company all over again.

tomorrow’s post will be on preventing project near-death experiences.

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